[MSA-talk] R: early mineralogy interest

Carol Jantzen jantzenc at bellsouth.net
Thu May 8 18:42:11 EDT 2014


Hi folks...

I was about 1.5 years of age and this is a pic of me and my dad in 1947...seems like I had no choice but to love mineralogy and geology ...and I do love it - its in my blood...  Dad made the educational geology kits for the Museum of Natural History and the Hayden Planetarium in NYC in the 1950's.  The "business" was run out of our home in Queens.  We would collect the raw materials for the kits all summer long and he had a jaw crusher and screens in the garage.  I got the job of gluing the numbers on the rocks while watching TV (early multi-tasking).  Then he opened a "rock shop" in Queens and started to supply the NYC schools (JHS and HS) with kits.  He even did dino bone and small polished stone as cereal give aways!!

His name was Ted Fredericks (my maiden name).  He later went on to supply colleges around the country and became Ward's major competition.  When I started getting advanced degrees in geology I wrote the educational text that went with the kits...like "how coal is formed" and "what is a mineral."  He is in the Rockhound Hall of Fame as an educator.

I most often got "paid" for helping him in minerals and not money but that suited me fine and I continued collecting well into my adult years.  I have a Museum quality collection that I have just donated to the Ruth Patrick Science Education Center (RPSEC) in Aiken, SC...here is a pic of me and the 1st specimen to go to RPSEC. A 21" high 250 lb. perthite interpenetrating twin (microcline host with albite lamellae).  

The minerals will be housed in what RPSEC is calling the "Fredericks Mineral Gallery" and there is a fund set up by that name if anyone had an additional specimens to donate (each donor will be credited with their name).  I also donated funds for display cabinets and lights.  It was announced today in the local newspaper.  I have had a life long interest in geology (3 degrees) and science education...so it seemed like the right thing to do.  This perthite is so big that kids can stroke it and feel the crystal faces and even hug it if they like. It came from the Ruggles mine in New Hampshire (dad collected it himself) and now a 2' x 3' canvas photo of the Ruggles mine hangs on the blank wall over my left shoulder in the pic.


                                                                 

Carol Jantzen




On May 8, 2014, at 2:34 AM, gregor at unisi.it wrote:

> well, as a child I was around to observe and collect almost everything which I could find in nature and seemed somehow curious or beautiful to any of our senses. And minerals and crystals as found on my trips through the Alpes was one of my favourite because, unlike flowers and mushrooms, they lasted longer (until eventually my mother became upset with all those dust-catchers and put them in the cellar).
> 
> Minerals inspired me then to take up chemistry end eventually become involved in materials science, solids with curious and useful physical and chemical properties.
> 
> This might be one useful thread to move interest in mineral exhibitions, sort of living museum offering the possibility to realize some experiment with polarized light, diffraction gratings and the like (BTW, 2014 is the International Year of Crystallography, http://www.iycr2014.org/).
> 
> I recently addressed this role of minerals in a short introduction to our mineral collection here at Siena, if you like I can make available the pdf of the slides (8 MB).
> 
> best
> 
> Miguel
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Hello, group,
> 
> I'm interested in what influenced many of you to become interested
> in mineralogy.
> 
> Pink feldspar gravel roads in the Black Hills of
> South Dakota caught my interest, as well as the exhibits at
> the South Dakota School of Mines. I had one of their
> mineral collections, sold with samples of uranium ore and asbestos.
> I was still interested in high school, then opted out of
> pre-med in chemistry for what eventually became geochemistry.
> 
> Yes, I have an agenda: I'm interested in what role, if any,
> mineral exhibits and museums played in developing your interests.
> I'm interested in what moved you all into the "pipeline" and what
> I can do to move younger people in that direction.
> 
> No, I won't use any personal stories without direct permission
> from you. And no, I won't hit you up for any money.
> 
> Cheers,
> Chris Tacker
> 
> R. Chris Tacker, Ph.D., P.G.
> Research Curator II in Geology
> North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences
> 
> Blogs:
> http://naturalsciencesresearch.wordpress.com/author/christacker/
> http://drsledge.wordpress.com/
> 
> 
> --
> Miguel Gregorkiewitz
> Dip Scienze Fisiche, della Terra e dell'Ambiente, Università
> via Laterina 8, I-53100 Siena, Europe
> fon +39'0577'233810 fax 233938
> email gregor at unisi.it
>   
> _______________________________________________
> MSA-talk mailing list
> MSA-talk at minlists.org
> http://lists.minlists.org/mailman/listinfo/msa-talk

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