[MSA-talk] Mineral name for perovskite-structured (Mg, Fe) silicate?

James Van Orman jav12 at case.edu
Wed May 28 16:46:57 EDT 2014


How about simply "birch" then. A short name would be nice after so many 
years of awkward appellations like "(Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite".

On 5/28/14 4:14 PM, Anton Chakhmouradian wrote:
>
> It is a bit "unfortunate" that LINGUNITE is already taken (thank you, 
> Thomas, for "chiming in"). So is BIRCHITE, actually (Ca-Cd 
> phospho-sulfate), but named after William Birch of Victoria Museum. 
> There has been a very good succinct retrospect published on mineral 
> physics in /Sciences of the Earth/ (ed. by Good, 1998); see under 
> "Matter, Properties..."  (pp. 523-535). Plenty of deserving people 
> have not been "mineralized" yet!
>
> Anton Chakhmouradian
>
> University of Manitoba
>
> *From:*Frank Spera [mailto:spera at geol.ucsb.edu]
> *Sent:* Wednesday, May 28, 2014 10:51 AM
> *To:* Thomas Sharp
> *Cc:* Anton Chakhmouradian; msa-talk at minlists.org
> *Subject:* Re: [MSA-talk] Mineral name for perovskite-structured (Mg, 
> Fe) silicate?
>
> Call it birchite unless already used to honor the guy who more or less 
> started mineral physics based on Bridgman foundations
>
> Fs
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
>
> On May 28, 2014, at 12:14 AM, Thomas Sharp <tom.sharp at asu.edu 
> <mailto:tom.sharp at asu.edu>> wrote:
>
>     Hi All
>
>     I was too busy this morning to chime in, but I would like to add a
>     few things.
>
>     (Mg,Fe)SiO3-perovskite, like all deep mantle minerals do occur
>     naturally in highly shocked meteorites.  Tomioka and Fujino (1997,
>     Science) found some that had formed from enstatite in a shock vein
>     in Tenham. At the same time, Sharp et al (1007 Science) found some
>     pyroxene-composition glass grains that we interpreted
>     as (Mg,Fe)SiO3-perovskite that crystallized from the silicate
>     melt. Unfortunately, Tomioka did not have enough material to get
>     sufficient diffraction data and the material I found had
>     transformed to glass in the relatively high temperature post-shock
>     environment. I have been looking in other highly shocked
>     meteorites to find crystalline silicate perovskite.Recently,
>     Miyahara et al (2011 PNAS)  found olivine that transformed
>     to (Mg,Fe)SiO3-perovskite plus magnesiowustite in a shocked
>     martian meteorite, but they had very little crystalline material.
>     There may be some XRD data on natural (Mg,Fe)SiO3-perovskite soon.
>
>     When this important compound is given a mineral name, it won't be
>     named after Lin-gun Liu because NaSi3AlO8-hollandite has already
>     been named Lingunite. It will be interesting to see what name is
>     given to one of the most abundant compounds in the earth.
>
>     Sincerely,
>
>     Thomas Sharp
>
>     Director, LeRoy-Eyring Center for Solid State Science
>
>     Professor, School of Earth and Space Exploration
>
>     tom.sharp at asu.edu <mailto:tom.sharp at asu.edu>
>
>     //
>
>     Thomas Sharp
>
>     Professor, School of Earth and Space Exploration
>
>     Director, LeRoy-Eyring Center for Solid State Science
>
>     Director, ASU/NASA Space Grant Program
>
>     tom.sharp at asu.edu <mailto:tom.sharp at asu.edu>
>
>     *From: *Anton Chakhmouradian <Anton.Chakhmouradian at umanitoba.ca
>     <mailto:Anton.Chakhmouradian at umanitoba.ca>>
>     *Date: *Tuesday, May 27, 2014 7:54 PM
>     *To: *"msa-talk at minlists.org <mailto:msa-talk at minlists.org>"
>     <msa-talk at minlists.org <mailto:msa-talk at minlists.org>>
>     *Subject: *[MSA-talk] Mineral name for perovskite-structured (Mg,
>     Fe) silicate?
>
>     Getting back on the topic of perovskite-type (Mg,Fe)SiO3 and
>     CaSiO3. To name (Mg,Fe)SiO3 after Lin-gun Liu seems like the most
>     appropriate thing to do, of course, but Fredrik William H.
>     Zachariasen certainly deserves one of the future perovskites to be
>     named after him, as well, for his instrumental role in deciphering
>     the structural relations between perovskites and other complex
>     ABO3 oxides under Goldschmidt's tutelage. Thomas Barth was
>     actually the first to publish the structure of CaTiO3, but there
>     is already a TOMBARTHITE (monazite-type hydrous Y
>     silicate). Zachariasen came up with the now-fundamental tolerance
>     factor concept. Here is some bio information on him for anyone
>     interested:
>
>     http://www.nasonline.org/publications/biographical-memoirs/memoir-pdfs/zachariasen-frederik.pdf
>
>     https://www.fas.org/sgp/othergov/doe/lanl/pubs/00818116.pdf
>
>     Incidentally, anyone fascinated by perovskites (or the history of
>     mineralogy) may be interested in reading our editorial in the PCM
>     thematic issue on these minerals:
>
>     http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00269-014-0678-9
>
>     Anton R. Chakhmouradian
>
>     University of Manitoba
>
>     *Sent:* Tuesday, May 27, 2014 9:31 AM
>     *To:* MSA public List serve
>     *Subject:* [MSA-talk] Mineral name for perovskite-structured (Mg,
>     Fe) silicate?
>
>     Friends-
>
>     I've just read a news release online about the new Zhang, et al.
>     Science paper "Disproportionation of (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite in
>     Earth's deep lower mantle".  Is there a mineral name for the
>     perovskite-structured (Mg,Fe)SiO3 mineral?  If not, then shouldn't
>     we come up with one?  It seems to me that the name "perovskite"
>     should apply to the CaTiO3 mineral, and that it's wrong to apply
>     it to the isostructural silicate, just as we don't give the same
>     mineral name to halite and galena.  The article title isn't so
>     bad, but when you get news releases that include this kind of
>     thing, then there's a real problem:
>
>     "The prevailing theory has been that the majority of the lower
>     mantle is made up of a single ferromagnesian silicate mineral,
>     commonly called perovskite (Mg,Fe)SiO3) defined through its
>     chemistry and structure. It was thought that perovskite didn't
>     change structure over the enormous range of pressures and
>     temperatures spanning the lower mantle"
>
>     The release's author here has presumably misinterpreted the
>     article's title to infer that "perovskite" is the name of the
>     mantle mineral, rather than "(Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite", indicating a
>     perovskite-structured silicate.
>
>     I understand that an official mineral name is not possible, since
>     it cannot be found occurring naturally and fully described, but
>     perhaps if the community decided on a name we could use in lieu of
>     the (to me) troubling "(Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite" or worse
>     "perovskite", then there might be a little more clarity and a
>     little less confusion out there, at least among mineralogy students.
>
>     -Dave
>
>     ============================
>
>     Dave Hirsch
>
>     Associate Professor
>
>     Department of Geology
>
>     Western Washington University
>
>     alternate email: dhirsch at mac.com <mailto:dhirsch at mac.com>
>
>     http://www.davehirsch.com
>
>     cell: (360) 389-3583
>
>     work: (360) 650-2166
>
>     fb: http://www.facebook.com/dave.hirsch
>
>     ============================
>
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