[MSA-talk] American Mineralogist Special Collection 35: Applications of Fluid, Mineral and Melt Inclusions

Matthew Steele-MacInnis steelema at ualberta.ca
Fri Nov 17 16:36:06 EST 2017


Sorry, for some reason the copy/paste resulted in some funny typos in what I sent before (all instances of “fi” were deleted; strange coincidence, for a paragraph about fluid inclusions...). Just to correct those:

> "The occurrence of fluid inclusions in minerals has been known for at least two millennia. Indeed, Pliny the Elder described what were probably fluid inclusions in crystals in his volume “Natural History”, written in about 75 AD. In about 400 AD, Claudius Claudianus wrote a poem about a large fluid inclusion in a quartz crystal entitled “On a crystal enclosing a drop of water”. According to Lemmlein (1950; quoted in Roedder, 1984), the first specific description of fluid inclusions in minerals was by Abu Raihan al-Biruni in the 11th century in his book Kitab al-Jawahir (Precious Stones). In the 13th century, Ahmad al-Tifashi wrote Azhar al Afkar (Best Thoughts on the Best of Stones) in which he mentions inclusions (“uyub”), liquid (inclusion) (“ma”), air bubble (“rih”), and mud inclusion (“teen”). Also, at approximately the same time, Albertus Magnus, a German scholar and Archbishop of Cologne, wrote a book on lapidary (“de mineralibus”) in which he described fluid inclusions in beryl. The earliest known description in English was by Robert Boyle (1672), who described a moving bubble in a quartz crystal... Fluid inclusions were cited as evidence of the hydrothermal origins of ore deposits as early as the mid-19th century by Ellie de Beaumont. Soon after, the first systematic studies of fluid inclusions (which he termed fluid-cavities) were made by H.C. Sorby (1858). Sorby demonstrated a range of fluid types in rocks and vein minerals, and even proposed methods to obtain information about conditions of mineral growth. He also linked fluids and mineral formation by describing aqueous inclusions in vein quartz, with homogenisation temperatures that decreased outward from an intrusion, a perfect source for ore-forming hydrothermal fluids. In those days, papers published by the Geological Society of London were first presented as lectures in a meeting room designed to be adversarial: friends and opponents of the speaker lined up on opposite sides of the chamber. After Sorby’s talk, the president of the society at the time apparently commented that it was the least plausible paper he had ever heard presented.”
> 
> Yardley, BWD and Bodnar, RJ 2014, Fluids in the Continental Crust, Geochemical Perspectives, Volume 3, Number 1 (pages 1-127)

————————————————
Matthew Steele-MacInnis
Assistant Professor
Dept. of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences
1-26 Earth Sciences Building
University of Alberta
Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2E3

https://sites.ualberta.ca/~steelema/
————————————————

> On Nov 17, 2017, at 2:25 PM, Matthew Steele-MacInnis <steelema at ualberta.ca> wrote:
> 
> Definitely Sorby’s 1858 paper is a good reference:
> 
> SORBY,HC (1858) On the microscopical structure of crystals, indicating the origin of minerals and rocks Quarterly Journal of the Geological Society of London 14, 453- 60
> 
> But it is worth mentioning that fluid inclusions in minerals were described much, much earlier too. The following text is from the Geochemical Perspectives volume by Yardley and Bodnar: 
> 
> "The occurrence of uid inclusions in minerals has been known for at least two millennia. Indeed, Pliny the Elder described what were probably uid inclu- sions in crystals in his volume “Natural History”, written in about 75 AD. In about 400 AD, Claudius Claudianus wrote a poem about a large uid inclusion in a quartz crystal entitled “On a crystal enclosing a drop of water”. According to Lemmlein (1950; quoted in Roedder, 1984), the rst speci c description of uid inclusions in minerals was by Abu Raihan al-Biruni in the 11th century in his book Kitab al-Jawahir (Precious Stones). In the 13th century, Ahmad al-Tifashi wrote Azhar al Afkar (Best Thoughts on the Best of Stones) in which he mentions inclusions (“uyub”), liquid (inclusion) (“ma”), air bubble (“rih”), and mud inclu- sion (“teen”). Also, at approximately the same time, Albertus Magnus, a German scholar and Archbishop of Cologne, wrote a book on lapidary (“de mineralibus”) in which he described uid inclusions in beryl. The earliest known description in English was by Robert Boyle (1672), who described a moving bubble in a quartz crystal... Fluid inclusions were cited as evidence of the hydrothermal origins of ore deposits as early as the mid-19th century by Ellie de Beaumont. Soon after, the rst systematic studies of uid inclusions (which he termed uid-cavities) were made by H.C. Sorby (1858). Sorby demonstrated a range of uid types in rocks and vein minerals, and even proposed methods to obtain information about conditions of mineral growth. He also linked fluids and mineral formation by describing aqueous inclusions in vein quartz, with homogenisation tempera- tures that decreased outward from an intrusion, a perfect source for ore-forming hydrothermal uids. In those days, papers published by the Geological Society of London were rst presented as lectures in a meeting room designed to be adversarial: friends and opponents of the speaker lined up on opposite sides of the chamber. After Sorby’s talk, the president of the society at the time apparently commented that it was the least plausible paper he had ever heard presented.”
> 
> Yardley, BWD and Bodnar, RJ 2014, Fluids in the Continental Crust, Geochemical Perspectives, Volume 3, Number 1 (pages 1-127)
> 
> 
> ————————————————
> Matthew Steele-MacInnis
> Assistant Professor
> Dept. of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences
> 1-26 Earth Sciences Building
> University of Alberta
> Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2E3
> 
> https://sites.ualberta.ca/~steelema/ <https://sites.ualberta.ca/~steelema/>
> ————————————————
> 
>> On Nov 17, 2017, at 2:16 PM, Frank Spera <spera at ucsb.edu <mailto:spera at ucsb.edu>> wrote:
>> 
>> my memory may not serve me correctly…but i think Sorby  noticed FC’s at the dawn of petrography.
>> 
>> i have not done the wiki/literature search thing…but somewhere in the deep creases of my brain i seem to recall this.
>>  Ed Roedder (of USGS 60’s-80’s  fame) publications, especially his early ones ,  would lay it all out, i bet
>>> On Nov 17, 2017, at 1:07 PM, Juan Manuel Garcia Ruiz <juanma.garciaruiz at gmail.com <mailto:juanma.garciaruiz at gmail.com>> wrote:
>>> 
>>> Hi,
>>> 
>>> Do you have information about when fluid inclusions were reported/described for the first time?
>>> 
>>> Thank you in advance 
>>> 
>>> Juanma Garcia-Ruiz
>>> 
>>> 2017-11-17 13:26 GMT-05:00 Matthew Steele-MacInnis <steelema at ualberta.ca <mailto:steelema at ualberta.ca>>:
>>> On behalf of Kyle Ashley, Claudia Cannatelli and Daniel Moncada, I would like to draw your attention to a new Special Collection in American Mineralogist entitled "Applications of Fluid, Mineral and Melt Inclusions.”
>>> 
>>> Description:
>>> The growths of crystals in rocks often lead to imperfections in the crystal in the form of fluid, melt, or mineral inclusions. Geological fluids rising from the mantle to the crust acquire, transport, degas and deposit different elements in igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. Numerous studies over the past half-century have described fluid and melt inclusions as the best repositories to investigate changes in inclusion properties and track the evolution of these fluids through time. Recently there has been a growing application of mineral inclusions in rigid hosts to constrain pressures and temperatures of porphyroblast growth. This special section aims to bring together researchers that focus their studies on the application of fluid, mineral and melt inclusions to understand the nature and timescale of geological processes in different geodynamic environments. Multidisciplinary approaches that combine natural observations, structural and/or deformation paths, laboratory experiments and theoretical and thermodynamic models are particularly encouraged.
>>> 
>>> This special section has grown from our session at the Goldschmidt conference in Paris earlier this year, although participation in that session is by no means a prerequisite and submissions from all interested parties are welcome. Note that in the American Mineralogist system, papers published as part of this special section will be published online as soon as they are ready (i.e., there is no waiting time for publication imposed by assembling a complete special collection).
>>> 
>>> In order to submit to this special collection, please remember to select “Special Collection (SC35): Applications of Fluid, Mineral and Melt Inclusions” from the drop-down menu in the “Classifications” tab during submission.  https://aminsubmissions.msubmit.net <https://aminsubmissions.msubmit.net/>
>>> 
>>> Kind regards,
>>> Matt
>>> ————————————————
>>> Matthew Steele-MacInnis
>>> Assistant Professor
>>> Dept. of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences
>>> 1-26 Earth Sciences Building
>>> University of Alberta
>>> Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2E3
>>> 
>>> https://sites.ualberta.ca/~steelema/ <https://sites.ualberta.ca/~steelema/>
>>> ————————————————
>>> 
>>> 
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>> 
> 

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